• Tag Archives Fuel Usage
  • DELTA-T ECM HYDRONICS – Redefining “The Plumber’s Playground”

    Hydronic heating comprises warming water as a medium, moving and expending its energy to warm an environment. Thus we have boilers as heat generators and radiation to convert heated water into warmth. Between these we must distribute our medium via pipes, pumps, valves and controls to meet heating demands.

    Basic hydronic system design rules of course must apply, but by and large the final product interpretation has been left to the tradesman/installer. This individualization provides a very attractive latitude of self-expression. Like an artist painting on a new canvas individual skills, styling and practice all comprise the final “picture”, with the author’s “signature” applied. Based upon our field observations we have come to refer to hydronic distribution in particular as “The Plumber’s Playground”, and with no apologies offered.

    Unfortunately the Laws of Physics apply equally to hydronic system installations as to any other enterprise. Therefore that maze of pipes, valves, circulators, controls and wiring evidenced in a “plumbers playground”, no matter how pretty, daunting or impressive is unnecessarily complex, costly and under-performs. In fact any system installed within the past three years or more not employing Delta-T ECM Hydronic Distribution Technology specifically is woefully under-performing!

    The Heating Game has changed, led by the Taco® Delta-T ECM VT2218 Hydronic Circulator and its supporting Taco® Zone Sentry Valves. We refer to it as “The Hydronic Revolution”, as it truly is! These two (2) devices, properly applied, can and do dramatically simplify the complexity and content of a conventional hydronic heating system. Again, properly applied and supported by contemporary control systems provided by an “Intelligent” System Aquastat with idealized piping (plumbing) can further enhance performance, as our work has evidenced. Our development efforts and observations are reflected within the remainder of this presentation.

    The Delta-T ECM Variable Speed, Intelligent, Multi-Temperature-Sensing Circulator is a marvel of applied technology. Its ability to sense, measure and maintain a preset temperature differential in a hydronic circuit virtually optimizes heat transfer efficiency in a single, automatic step. Further being able to accommodate varying demands from multiple zones (circuits) virtually seamlessly as we have evidenced places it as the heart of any hydronic system. Using an automotive analogy we slogan that we are putting an ‘Automatic Transmission’ on a Boiler, but doing it hydronically.

    Now pair this Taco® Delta-T ECM Circulator with a compliment of their Zone Sentry® Zone Valves and you dramatically reduce energy consumption while gaining some further fuel efficiency. As Taco® promotes we are seeing distribution power consumption drops to 11-13 watts and in another instance to 8 watts during normal operation! Compare these with 80 watts for a single Taco® 007 and 21 watts each  for a Heat Motor Zone Valve. (The Zone Sentry® uses 11 watts, and then only in a brief actuator “charging cycle”.) Hydronic heating system power consumption is virtually never considered in design, but it should and furthermore must be!

    Piping is the pride of any plumber (ourselves included) yet in so being can become a detriment to system performance. To this point we offer that hydronic convection (the natural attribute of heated water to rise, and cooler fall) is not considered as a positive contribution to system performance, but an attribute to be controlled. As we have witnessed in our design effort however, natural convection is a measurable asset, particularly when configuring piping and placement to maximize its effect. Near-boiler piping, to employ the trade term, is crucial to maximizing hydronic performance. Compacted packaging of correct pipe sizing and layout close to the boiler displays great natural (non-powered) circulation that may not only supplement but also heat at reduced levels. We had an early Delta-T Circulator failure on one of our “beta” installations that was not discovered for an estimated 2-3 days! How’s that for convection — like “paddling your canoe with the current”.

    When you fully integrate the “intelligent” Delta-T ECM Circulator, Zone Valves and Aquastat with idealized convection you come to the conclusion that hydronic system installation is no longer a process, but functionally becomes an Appliance. Our resultant “package” is contained within its boiler footprint plus minimal rear piping space. A designer need only define system capacity, number of zones, fuel type and exhausting to define the “appliance”. Further, the application lends itself to modularization, and thus to versatility by default. Not only do we significantly reduce the material content of a system, but its labor content and installation time as well.

    Now there is both a trade and consumer option, a virtual Hydronic Heating Appliance with a fixed cost and defined, superlative performance. Our work to date has been developing a “Package Delta-T ECM Hydronic (Oil) Heating System” that achieves its higher performance by incorporating Delta-T ECM Hydronic Distribution Technology with a high-mass, lower operating temperature boiler for optimized performance. But also recognize that Delta-T ECM Circulation will work on any fueled hydronic application, putting an “automatic transmission” on ANY boiler. This obviously reduces the size, content and complexity of the “Plumber’s Playground”, but to a net performance advantage in doing so.

    To summarize, a “Hydronic Heating Appliance” is in our near future, defined by technology and necessitated by the market, like it or not. Its Performance Specification will virtually determine system performance, unlike the potpourri of present practice. Our publicized contributions are documented on our website www.BoilersOnDemand.com.  Please note that our current and following product offerings are under Intelligent Property Protection (Patent Pending). We look forward to “Boilers On Demand” in the new “Plumber’s Playground”.


  • WHAT TO DO WITH THE OLD STEAM HEATING SYSTEM? RUNS WELL, BUT THIRSTY!

    In the 1800’s steam was king! It ran the trains, industries, ships, heated the largest buildings and the finest homes. Steam heating continued in this respect into the early 1900’s to even smaller homes, providing distinctive styling and comfort to the American Lifestyle.

    Those beautiful Victorians, updated Colonials, Southern Manors, Seaside Mansions and latter day Bungalows were all heated by steam as the method of choice. They featured ornate radiation and huge central boilers fired by coal, cotton waste, corncobs, peat moss or wood — and lots of it!

    The age of cheap energy has passed and so seemingly the Age of Steam Heating ….. but not so fast! There is an old adage of “throwing the baby out with the bath water”, cautioning us to not dispose of the good to rid us of the bad. This aptly applies to steam heating in our opinion.

    The simplicity and comfort level of steam heating is unarguable. Those well placed, aesthetic and space efficient radiators emit both heat with a light hiss of escaping steam simultaneously heating AND humidifying our air. Room temperature can be reduced somewhat without a comfort penalty. To duplicate this environment requires mechanical creation using power humidifiers or more complicated HVAC Systems. (That’s also why common homes had a tub of water on the heating stove.)

    Three usage factors affect steam heating:

    1. Fuel efficiency. Those old steamers have heat exchanger passages and flue pipes intended for large, continuous combustion, low temperature fires that are the polar opposites of small passage, high temperature oil or gas fired systems.
    2. Installation or repair cost. Residential steamfitting is one of those fading (and therefore expensive) arts, it seems.
    3. Flexibility. Those big iron pipes don’t stretch or move readily. Extending a system seems formidable.

    Not so fast, again!

    You may have noticed that virtually nothing ever happens to the radiators and piping in your system — the distribution side of things. Yes, a radiator vent may stick so it can’t be adjusted. So you unscrew it (with the steam turned down) and replace it. A valve stem leaks, so you tighten or pack it. Unlike hydronic systems, no gurgling, noisy, tinny registers, circulators, relays or vents to go bad. Steam provides the absolute in physical non-mechanical distribution simplicity, efficiency and durability. This is the “baby” in our analogy.

    The “bath water” is that beast of a boiler — the dinosaur. This is where virtually all of the efficiency gains are to be had (plus a little smart usage). Additionally, this is where the third factor (flexibility) must be introduced and discussed in common.

    A steam boiler is like putting a partially-filled pot of water on the stove with a perforated cover over it to let steam escape in a controlled manner. When you turn on the stove the water rose in temperature until it generated steam. If you don’t need steam the water in the pot is still hot in degree and usable heat. There are therefore two usable components in a steam boiler — hot water and steam. As in past steam systems you can employ the hot water component to provide domestic hot water and additional forced hot water zone heating. So if you want to stretch your steam system to heat the garage or that added room, it’s available.

    That big iron hulk down there was designed with complimentary, rather large distribution piping. Hopefully at some point or through your efforts heat loss of the building has been improved. You don’t need the distribution size as a result. This is not necessarily a detriment, however. What is more important is to not under size the replacement boiler and it’s steaming time.

    As you create steam in a boiler, the boiler water level is reduced as steam rises throughout the distribution (pipes & radiators). Steam is condensed in the radiators giving heat, and this condensate (now as hot water) cools, slowly trickling back to the boiler. If you generate a lot of steam rapidly from a too small boiler, the water level drops quickly. The low water indicator feeds a quantity of new water into the boiler by design. Then the eventual returning surge of condensate “floods” the boiler, reducing or limiting its ability to create steam (heat). Make-up water management can be important.

    Worse, in the smaller boiler scenario there is also the danger of overheating the boiler to the extent that thermal shocking can be induced by replacement water, damaging the boiler.

    There are tricks to reduce these scenarios, but there is one guideline that works every time:

    Boiler Weight (Size) and Water Capacity = Performance Efficiency with Longer Boiler Life (Just look at the unit you are replacing.)

    We invite you therefore to compare the weights and capacities of Weil-McLain Steam Boilers with all of its competitors.

    If you are still determined to be rid of the old steam system in entirety, so be it. But save back those radiators. Don’t give your installer an extra payday.